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WallBuilders mission is “presenting America’s forgotten history and heroes, with an emphasis on our moral, religious, and constitutional heritage.” Two of our great heroes largely forgotten today include Dr. Benjamin Rush (signer of the Declaration, who John Adams considered as one of America’s three most notable Founders [1]) and Elias Boudinot (pictured to the right; president of the Continental Congress and a framer of the Bill of Rights in the first federal Congress).

As an indication of the Christian connection between the two, we thought you might enjoy the content of a letter from Dr. Rush to Elisha Boudinot, brother of Elias. [2] This inspiring letter offers Elisha condolences on the loss of his wife, Catharine. It contains what can be considered as nothing less than strong evangelical and Biblical language from Dr. Rush.

Elisha was active in the patriot cause [3] and served as a Justice of the Supreme Court of New Jersey. [4] He was anti-slavery [5] and also worked to help prepare men for the Gospel ministry. [6] His wife was active in helping the poor and needy in their community. [7]
The couple was so beloved by their neighbors that when their house burned, the neighbors not only turned out en masse to rebuild it [8] but also established the city’s first fire department to prevent similar future losses. [9]

Founding Fathers such as Benjamin Rush and the Boudinots help reaffirm that America was built on strong religious and moral foundations by leaders of committed Biblical faith.


[1] John Sanderson, Biography of the Signers to the Declaration of Independence (Philadelphia: R. W. Pomeroy, 1823), Vol. IV pp. 283. See also, L. H. Butterfield, “The Reputation of Benjamin Rush,” Pennsylvania History, January 1950, Vol. XVII, No. 1, p. 9, John Adams to Richard Rush on May 5, 1813.
[2] J.J. Boudinot, The Life Public Services, Addresses, and Letters of Elias Boudinot, LL.D., President of Continental Congress (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, and Company, 1896), Vol. I, p. 32. See also, Frank John Urquhart, A History of the City of Newark, New Jersey (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1913), Vol. 2, p. 603.
[3] Rev. W. Wallace Atterbury, Elias Boudinot: Reminiscences of the American Revolution (Read Before the Hugenot Society, February 15, 1894), p. 38. See also, David Lawrence Pierson, Narratives of Newark, (Newark: N.J.: Pierson Publishing Co, 1917), p 190; Frank John Urquhart, A History of the City of Newark, New Jersey (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1913), Vol. 2, p. 604.
[4] Edward Hagaman Hall, The Sons of the American Revolution (New York: New York State Society, 1894), p. 57.
[5] , Frank John Urquhart, A History of the City of Newark, New Jersey (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1913), Vol. 2, p. 606.
[7] Historic Newark: A Collection of Facts and Traditions (Newark, N.J.: Fidelity Union Trust Company, 1916), p. 24. See also, J.J. Boudinot, The Life Public Services, Addresses, and Letters of Elias Boudinot, LL.D., President of Continental Congress (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, and Company, 1896), Vol. I, p. 39.
[8] Historic Newark: A Collection of Facts and Traditions (Newark, N.J.: Fidelity Union Trust Company, 1916), p. 24.
[9] William H. Shaw, History of Essex and Hudson Counties, New Jersey (Philadelphia: Everts & Peck, 1884), Vol. 1, p. 458.
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