how-much-do-you-know-about-the-constitution-1

Two hundred and twenty-seven years ago, on September 17th 1787, in a warm room in Philadelphia, 39 men signed the document that formed our nation. With each passing year, America continues her record of having the longest on-going constitutional republic in history.
how-much-do-you-know-about-the-constitution-2To celebrate this great document, WallBuilders is now offering Constitution Alive! A Citizen’s Guide to the Constitution. Filmed in that very room and the amazing WallBuilders library, now you can learn more about this important document and how it not only shaped and built our country, but also how it can help you stand for your rights and those of others today. (To hear a special preview, be sure to tune into this week’s WallBuilders Live!)

To celebrate Constitution Day this year, we’ll be posting quiz questions on our Facebook and Twitter pages during the lunch hour (12PM to 1PM Central Time) hour. Be sure to like our Facebook page or Follow us on Twitter so you won’t miss out on your chance to win a free God in the Constitution mp3!
Because you are a loyal WallBuilders’ fan, here is a sneak peek at our list of questions that we will choose from to ask (and links to help you find the answers):
  1. Of the 39 signers of the Constitution, how many had previously signed the Declaration of Independence?  
    (https://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/declaration/bio.htm) (link no longer available)
  2. The Constitution was signed in 1787, but was not binding until it was ratified.  When did that happen?
    (https://www.heritage.org/initiatives/first-principles/primary-sources/the-constitution-of-the-us)
  3. Which state was the first to ratify the new constitution?
    (https://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/constitution-day/ratification.html)
  4. Which state was the last to ratify the Constitution?
    (https://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/constitution-day/ratification.html)
  5. How many articles does the Constitution contain?
    (https://wallbuilders.com/LIBissuesarticles.asp?id=36438)
  6. Which article is the longest, and why?
    (https://www.visitthecapitol.gov/about-congress#.U_dlFmNi-ik)
  7. The Constitution Convention met in Philadelphia for the purpose of creating a document that would establish a new government for the States. True or False?
    (https://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/continental/constit.html)

To learn more about the Constitution,
be sure to also check out the following products!

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How’d you do?
  1. Six: Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman, Robert Morris, George Clymer, George Read, and James Wilson
  2. It was ratified on June 21, 1788, when New Hampshire became the 9th state to ratify the Constitution, as specified in Article 7 of the Constitution. The new government under the Constitution came into effect on March 4, 1789.
  3. Delaware, on December 7, 1787
  4. Rhode island, on May 29, 1790
  5. Seven
  6. Article I is the longest.  It organizes and governs the legislative branch, which was the branch closest to the people and the most important of the three branches. It was therefore given the most, and the most powerful responsibilities.
  7. False.  The purpose was to address and solve the weaknesses that had become apparent under the Articles of Confederation, the document under which the country had been governed during the American Revolution.
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