Who was the “Father of the Revolution”?

Samuel Adams
(1722-1803)

September 27 marks 292 years since the birth of one of America’s most prominent Founding Fathers. He influence was so great that he was one of only two Founding Fathers the King of England said he would not pardon for his leadership in the American Revolution. [1]

who-was-the-father-of-the-revolution-1

A merchant by trade, Adams’ true passion was politics. [2]  As early as 1763, Samuel was already making a stand against the British crown, [3] trying to convince all who would listen that England had no right to impose policies on the colonies since the colonies had no representation in the British legislature. He was elected to the Massachusetts General Assembly in 1765, [4] and while serving in the state legislature became a more visible and vocal leader in opposition to British tyranny, even participating in the Boston Tea Party in 1773. [5]

Elected to the Continental Congress in 1774, Adams was crucial in helping delegates overcome their religious differences to unite together and open Congress with prayer (see the picture below) – something that Congress had done every day since then. He was a signer of the Declaration of Independence [6] and also helped draft the Articles of Confederation in 1777. [7]

who-was-the-father-of-the-revolution-2

 

Adams also helped write the original Massachusetts constitution (1780) – the only constitution in the world still in use today that is older than the U. S. Constitution. [8]

who-was-the-father-of-the-revolution-3

After the U. S. Constitution was written, he was a member of the 1788 state convention to ratify the Constitution, [9] where he opposed it because he believed that it failed to adequately protect individual liberties and state powers from the intrusion of the federal government. His opposition helped fuel the movement that resulted in the addition of the Bill or Rights in 1791.

In addition to his work on the national level, Adams served Massachusetts as Lieutenant Governor (under Governor John Hancock) and then as Governor. [10] A dedicated and outspoken Christian throughout his long life, Adams frequently called citizens to times of prayer and fasting, and prayer and thanksgiving, such as in this 1794 Thanksgiving Proclamation, this 1795 Thanksgiving Proclamation, this 1796 Thanksgiving Proclamation, this 1795 Fasting  Proclamation:(pictured below), and others.

who-was-the-father-of-the-revolution-4

Samuel Adams died on October 3, 1803. [11] His influence and leadership in helping secure America’s independence has caused him to be titled, “Father of the Revolution.” [12]

To find out more about Samuel Adams
check out these great products!

who-was-the-father-of-the-revolution-5 who-was-the-father-of-the-revolution-6

[1] Benson J. Lossing, Biographical Sketches of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence  (New York: George F. Cooledge & Brother, 1848), p. 35.

 

[2] Benson J. Lossing, Biographical Sketches of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence  (New York: George F. Cooledge & Brother, 1848), p. 34.

 

[3] Benson J. Lossing, Biographical Sketches of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence  (New York: George F. Cooledge & Brother, 1848), p. 34.

 

[4] Benson J. Lossing, Biographical Sketches of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence  (New York: George F. Cooledge & Brother, 1848), p. 35.

 

[5] William V. Wells, The Life and Public Services of Samuel Adams (Cambridge: University Press, 1865), Vol. II, p. 122-125.

 

[6] “The Declaration of Independence: A Transcript,” National Archives, July 4, 1776 (at: http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/declaration_transcript.html). See also, Benson J. Lossing, Biographical Sketches of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence  (New York: George F. Cooledge & Brother, 1848), p. 36, “Signers of the Declaration of Independence,”  ushistory.org  (at: http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/signers/) (accessed on July 2, 2010).

 

[7] William V. Wells, The Life and Public Services of Samuel Adams (Cambridge: University Press, 1865), Vol. II, pp. 472-475.

 

[8] Leonard Levy, Seasoned Judgments: The American Constitution, Rights and History (1995), p. 307 (at: http://books.google.com/books?id=-7lKq0dfs54C&pg=PA307=onepage&q&f=false); compared to the date of the U.S. Constitution recognized as “the the world’s longest surviving written charter of government” at: http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/generic/ConstitutionDay.htm. See also, William V. Wells, The Life and Public Services of Samuel Adams (Cambridge: University Press, 1865), Vol. III, p. 79.

 

[9] William V. Wells, The Life and Public Services of Samuel Adams (Cambridge: University Press, 1865), Vol. III, pp. 250-264.

 

[10] Benson J. Lossing, Biographical Sketches of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence  (New York: George F. Cooledge & Brother, 1848), p. 36.

 

[11] Benson J. Lossing, Biographical Sketches of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence  (New York: George F. Cooledge & Brother, 1848), p. 36.

 

[12] William V. Wells, The Life and Public Services of Samuel Adams (Cambridge: University Press, 1865), Vol. I, p. 11, Harry Clinton Green and Mary Wolcott Green, The Pioneer Mothers of America (New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1912)  p. 59.
print
By |2017-04-03T19:56:10+00:00January 2nd, 2017|Categories: Library, Updates|0 Comments