Black History Resources

Many heroes and topics were discussed on the February 2, 2018 TBN show “America’s Hidden History” with David Barton, Tim Barton, and Bishop Jim Lowe. (You can watch the entire episode on TBN here.) Below are some helpful resources to find out more! (Right click on the images for larger versions to download.)


Misc. People

William Nell

 

William Nell
Biographical Resources:
Black Past
African American Registry

Phillis Wheatley

 

Phillis Wheatley
Biographical Resources:
PBS
Biography
Poetry Foundation
National Women’s History Museum

Poetry:
Phillis Wheatley, Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (1887 edition)

 

John Wise
Biographical Resources:
Encyclopedia Britannica
Historic Ipswich

1772 reprint; Wise sermon.

Sermons:
Excerpted from “History of the Block Robe Regiment

As early as 1687, the Rev. Wise was already teaching that “taxation without representation is tyranny,” the “consent of the governed” was the foundation of government, and that “every man must be acknowledged equal to every man.” In 1772 with the Revolution on the horizon, two of Wise’s works were reprinted by leading patriots and the Sons of Liberty to refresh America’s understanding of the core Biblical principles of government. (The first printing sold so fast that a quick second reprint was quickly issued.)

Work Reprinted in 1772:
John Wise, A Vindication of the Government of New England Churches (Boston: J. Allen, 1717). Read it here.
(To the left is a picture of the 1772 reprint of this work from WallBuilders’ collection.)


Modern Events & People

 

Lynching in America
Excerpt from WallBuilders’ 2003 Black History Issue Newsletter:

Of all forms of violent intimidation, lynchings were by far the most effective. Between 1882 and 1964, 4,743 persons were lynched — 3,446 blacks and 1,297 whites.

 

1964 Civil Rights Bill Resources
National Park Service
National Archives

 

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr
Biographical Resources:
Nobel Prize
Louisiana State University

On the Declaration of Independence:

If our nation had done nothing more in its whole history than to create just two documents, its contribution to civilization would be imperishable. The first of these documents is the Declaration of Independence and the other is that which we are here to honor tonight, the Emancipation Proclamation. All tyrants, past, present and future, are powerless to bury the truths in these declarations, no matter how extensive their legions, how vast their power and how malignant their evil. The Declaration of Independence proclaimed to a world, organized politically and spiritually around the concept of the inequality of man, that the dignity of human personality was inherent in man as a living being. The Emancipation Proclamation was the offspring of the Declaration of Independence. It was a constructive use of the force of law to uproot a social order which sought to separate liberty from a segment of humanity.

When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the “unalienable Rights” of “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”


American War for Independence Soldiers

Marquis de Lafayette & James Armistead

 

James Armistead
Biographical Resources:
WallBuilders
Biography
Black Past
US Army
Joseph T. Wilson, The Black Phalanx; A History of the Negro Soldiers of the United States in the Wars of 1775-1812, 1861-’65 (Hartford, CT: American Publishing Company, 1890), pp. 50-51.

Battle of Bunker Hill

 

Peter Salem & the Battle of Bunker Hill
Resources:
PBS
Black Past
National Museum of African American History & Culture
William Nell, The Colored Patriots of the American Revolution (Boston: Robert F. Wallcut, 1855), pp. 20-21.

 

Washington Crossing the Delaware

Washington Crossing the Delaware
Prince Whipple Resources:
Whipple Website
Black Past
William Nell, The Colored Patriots of the American Revolution (Boston: Robert F. Wallcut, 1855), pp. 198-199.

Oliver Cromwell Resources:
Burlington County New Jersey
William Nell, The Colored Patriots of the American Revolution (Boston: Robert F. Wallcut, 1855), pp. 160-162.

 

Battle of Lexington

Prince Estabrook & the Battle of Lexington
Resources:
WallBuilders
PBS
Historical Marker Database
The Essex Gazette (April 25, 1775), where he’s listed among the wounded.

 

Prince Sisson
Biographical Resources:
WallBuilders
James M. Guthrie, Camp Fire of the Afro-American; or the Colored Man as a Patriot (Philadelphia: 1899), p. 141.
William Nell, The Colored Patriots of the American Revolution (Boston: Robert F. Wallcut, 1855), p. 127.


Pastors

 

Richard Allen

Rev. Richard Allen
Biographical Resources:
PBS
Black Past
Biography
The Life Experience and Gospel Labors of the Rt. Rev. Richard Allen…Written by Himself and Published by His Request (Philadelphia: 1880)

 

Frederick Douglass

Rev. Frederick Douglass
Biographical Resources:
White House Historical Association
National Park Service
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave. Written by Himself (Boston: 1847)

 

Henry Highland Garnet

Rev. Henry Highland Garnet
Biographical Resources:
WallBuilders
Black Past
PBS

Sermon at the Capitol:
Available in its entirety on Google Books.

 

Signature in Haynes’ Common Place-Book to the Holy Bible.

Lemuel Haynes

Rev. Lemuel Haynes
Biographical Resources:
Black Past
PBS
Sketches of the Life and Character of the Rev. Lemuel Haynes (New York: 1837)
William Nell, The Colored Patriots of the American Revolution (Boston: Robert F. Wallcut, 1855), pp. 123-124.

Harry Hoosier

 

Rev. Harry Hoosier
Biographical Resources:
WallBuilders
Indiana Public Radio
Indiana Magazine of History

Absalom Jones

 

Rev. Absalom Jones
Biographical Resources:
Black Past
African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas
PBS


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By | 2018-02-12T07:19:14+00:00 February 12th, 2018|Categories: Featured, Library, Uncategorized|0 Comments